Mainstream

Southwestern CEO: Industry Losing with Fourth-Graders

Some fourth-graders in New York state agree that they don’t want unconventional drilling using hydraulic fracturing (fracking) in their state, but they didn’t arrive at that conclusion because of biased messages in the classroom, said Southwestern Energy CEO Steve Mueller. They just don’t know that “natural gas is a true national treasure.”

February 7, 2013
Producer Has New Hope for Montana’s False Bakken

Producer Has New Hope for Montana’s False Bakken

In Montana in a “forgotten corner of the Williston Basin,” a Texas company is gathering up acreage with the expectation that it can turn what some call the False Bakken into a true gem. And if that doesn’t work, northeast Montana has more to offer in and near the Bakken Petroleum System.

November 13, 2012

Unconventionals a Building Block for Producers Worldwide

A shift by global natural gas and oil companies to unconventionals, liquefied natural gas (LNG) and the deepwater has lifted prospective value growth across the upstream sector by 23% from a year ago, according to new research by industry consultant Wood Mackenzie.

August 24, 2011

ExxonMobil, Chevron Heeding Mistrust of Hydrofracking

ExxonMobil Corp. this week launched a public relations campaign while Chevron Corp. is working with industry groups to assure the public that drilling unconventional wells using hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) is safe. The moves preceded separate annual meetings where shareholders voiced growing support for more disclosure about the well stimulation practices.

May 27, 2011

Chesapeake CEO: Gasifying Transport System ‘Holy Grail’ of Industry

Finding a way to use natural gas as a mainstream transportation fuel is the “holy grail’ for the industry, Chesapeake Energy Corp. Aubrey McClendon told a packed audience last week at the World Shale Gas Conference & Exhibition in Grapevine, TX.

November 8, 2010

Chesapeake CEO: Gasifying Transport System ‘Holy Grail’ of Industry

Finding a way to use natural gas as a mainstream transportation fuel is the “holy grail’ for the industry, Chesapeake Energy Corp. Aubrey McClendon told a packed audience Wednesday at the World Shale Gas Conference & Exhibition in Grapevine, TX.

November 4, 2010

Industry Briefs

Breaking down the respective costs of various mainstream home energy sources, natural gas will be the cheapest to use in 2007, according to the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The DOE forecast of projected costs of natural gas, heating oil, electric, propane and kerosene energy use was published in the March 21 Federal Register. According to DOE, one million Btus of natural gas will cost an estimated $12.18 this year — while the same amount of electricity will cost families more than twice as much ($31.21) on average. Natural gas will also cost less than heating oil ($16.01), kerosene ($19.48) and propane ($20.47). “These cost savings can add up quickly, especially for home heating and water heating,” said Tom Moskitis, American Gas Association (AGA) managing director of external affairs. “For water heating, an average household using a conventional storage type water heater would save around $220 per year in energy costs by using a natural gas water heater instead of a similar electric unit. That means the natural gas water heater can pay for itself after just a few years — and save a consumer $2,000 in energy costs over the nine-year life of the appliance.” According to AGA analysis of the DOE’s cost projections, the least expensive way to heat a home in 2007 is with a high-efficiency (94%) natural gas furnace. The association said this option will cost consumers an estimated $801 in 2007, compared with $1,930 for the most expensive home-heating option — an electric resistance system (such as electric warm air furnace heating). For the full year 2007, AGA found that an 84%-efficient oil furnace would cost a consumer $946 while a 94%-efficient propane furnace would cost $1,184. An electric 7.7 HSPF heat pump would come the closest to the natural gas option, costing customers $814 in 2007.

April 16, 2007

DOE Taps Natural Gas as Cheapest Home Energy for 2007

Breaking down the respective costs of various mainstream home energy sources, natural gas will be the cheapest to use in 2007, according to the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The DOE forecast of projected costs of natural gas, heating oil, electric, propane and kerosene energy use was published in the March 21 Federal Register.

April 10, 2007

Allison: Natural Gas Volatility Within Historical Range

As the natural gas futures market dropped $9.330 cents from an all-time high of $15.780 in December 2005 to a low of $6.450 in March 2006, concerns from the mainstream media continue to grow that the market’s price swings might be attached to market manipulation.

May 4, 2006

Newspapers Give Energy Bill Failing Grade, Call it ‘Monstrosity, Half-Baked’

A number of leading mainstream newspapers across the nation, both conservative and liberal, have come out in opposition to the Republican-crafted omnibus energy bill, calling it a mishmash of tax breaks and subsidies for special interest groups rather than a serious stab at bolstering energy supplies and infrastructure. They urged the Senate to filibuster the measure and go back to the drawing board.

November 20, 2003