Drinking

EPA Science Board Sparks Debate With Final Review of 2015 Fracking Study

The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) on Thursday released its final review of EPA’s landmark study published last year on the impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on drinking water resources.

August 12, 2016

EPA Science Panel Fine Tunes Concerns Over Fracking, Drinking Water Study

For the second time in less than six weeks, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) has released a draft report that tweaks its landmark assessment last year that hydraulic fracturing (fracking) poses no “widespread, systemic impacts” to drinking water.

February 18, 2016

Fracking Not A Factor in Wyoming Water Tests For Pavillion Gas Wells

Contrary to earlier federal reports, hydraulic fracturing (fracking) fluids were not a factor at shallow depths intersecting groundwater supplies at Pavillion, WY, according to a draft final report from the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ).

December 22, 2015
EPA Finds No Overall Drinking Water Problems From Fracking

EPA Finds No Overall Drinking Water Problems From Fracking

A draft assessment of the potential impacts on drinking water from hydraulic fracturing (fracking), released Thursday by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), said the agency has found no systemic impacts on drinking water, but it cautioned that there still are risks.

June 4, 2015
EPA Frack Study Finds No Systemic Impacts on Drinking Water

EPA Frack Study Finds No Systemic Impacts on Drinking Water

A draft assessment of the potential impacts to drinking water from hydraulic fracturing (fracking), released Thursday by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), said the agency found no systemic impacts to date to drinking water, but there are “potential vulnerabilities.”

June 4, 2015

More Flak Over California Injection Wells, Groundwater Impacts

The California oil/gas industry and its regulators have gone on the offensive over allegations that drinking water has been contaminated due to lax oversight of underground injection and that hydraulic fracturing (fracking) may have been involved.

February 17, 2015

Wyoming Initiates Water Testing Rules for Drilling

Oil and natural gas regulators in Wyoming on Tuesday initiated a rulemaking process for exploration and production (E&P) operators regarding water testing as part of the drilling permit application process.

July 22, 2013

Industry Briefs

A lawsuit filed by Range Resources Corp. against a Texas couple that accused the company of contaminating drinking water with drilling activity should be heard in state district court in Weatherford, TX, the Texas Second District Court of Appeals in Fort Worth ruled recently. Landowners Steven and Shyla Lipsky sued Range in 2011 after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an order that said Range was responsible for the contamination. However, EPA ultimately backed down from its claim (see Shale Daily, April 2). Range counter-sued the Lipskys and environmental consultant, Alisa Rich of Wolf Eagle Environmental, claiming that they conspired to incriminate the company. The Lipsky’s lawsuit against Range was thrown out, but Range’s counter-suit was allowed to proceed (see Shale Daily, Aug. 29, 2012). The case could still be heard in appeals court but only if all parties, including the trial court judge, agree to it by April 11. Range is seeking $3 million in damages. A Range spokesman said the company was still considering the court question, but is confident that the original ruling is correct and that Range’s claims should proceed to trial.

April 4, 2013

Marcellus Water Study Finds Chloride and TSS Risk, But Spill Unlikely

Water samples taken downstream of facilities authorized to treat wastewater from natural gas wells in the Marcellus Shale had elevated concentrations of chloride but not total suspended solids (TSS), although the obverse was true in samples collected downstream of watersheds with shale gas wells drilled on them, according to a report published in the Proceedings of National Academies of Sciences (PNAS).

March 13, 2013

Industry Briefs

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) on Tuesday approved RRC staff-recommended revisions to proposed changes to commission rules governing casing, cementing, drilling and completion of wells; cathodic protection wells; and seismic holes and core holes. Changes were initially proposed in September in response to action by the Texas Legislature. The revised proposal for changes takes into account responses received by commission staff during a public comment period. The current 45-day public comment period will end at noon April 1. A public hearing is scheduled for 1:30 CST Feb. 21 at the RRC’s Austin office.

February 5, 2013
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