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Pipeline Protestors Are Younger, More Colorful

Pipeline Protestors Are Younger, More Colorful

Protestors who are writing to FERC to express their dissatisfaction with pipeline projects are getting younger and more colorful.

A first or second grader, judging by her handwriting, sent a letter to Commission Secretary David Boergers citing her dismay with the siting of a compression station near Parshallville, MI, for the proposed Vector Pipeline [CP98-131, CP98-133]. "Dear Mr. Boergers [with a backward s], please don't build the gas plant here and make the horses and cows and sheep go away. Thank you, Annie." She provided FERC with a drawing of a horse for effect.

A 14-year-old also said she was "writting" FERC because "I feel that it is wrong of you [Vector] to build your plant" in that area. "My church is right across the highway from this sight and I do not want to take the chance of our church blowing up for the second time. I would greatly appreciate [it] if you could find a new location for your building."

A couple from Lone Jack, MO, who submitted comments in FERC's proceeding on the landowner-notification process, used color photo inlays to drive home the point of notifying residents about pipeline projects early in the process [RM98-17]. The main color inlay showed the couple's backyard with a swing set and slide in the foreground and a Williams Pipelines Central compressor station in the background.

Under the photo inlay, the couple wrote: "The facility presents an unwanted/unnecessary hazard, is noisy, is an eyesore, and devalues property. We were cheated out of our opportunity to work with the company, FERC, federal, state and local agencies before approval. Would you like your children to play here?"

Susan Parker

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ISSN © 2577-9877 | ISSN © 1532-1266
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