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Shale Gas Innovation Contest Crowns Another Four Appalachian Companies

Four young companies took home a combined $80,000 this month at the fifth annual Shale Gas Innovation Contest for technology breakthroughs that could be applied to the midstream, compressed natural gas (CNG), water treatment and environmental management sectors.

The State College, PA-based Ben Franklin Shale Gas Innovation and Commercialization Center (SGICC) issued checks for $20,000 each to the winning companies from Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Established in 2011 to foster and commercialize early-stage technologies that benefit the environment and the shale gas industry, the SGICC's contest is considered a cornerstone of its work and has grown significantly since its first year.

Aridea Solutions, of Charleston, WV, won for an "on-demand" pneumatic valve system operated through proprietary software via the internet that allows remote control of hard-to-access midstream sites.

Compass Natural Gas, of Mechanicsburg, PA, won an award for the compression stations it has developed that enable significant deliveries of CNG to large and small industrial customers in the region that don't currently have access to a pipeline.

Pittsburgh-based Epiphany Water Solutions took home an award for its well pad-based water remediation technology that uses a proprietary crystallizing chamber to rid wastewater of contaminants, leaving only pure steam that can be further evaporated for zero discharge. The equipment is hybrid powered and can use natural gas, solar or hard-wire power.

HalenHardy LLC, of Bellwood, PA, was the other award winner for its Spilltration product line, which is made from recycled materials and engineered to absorb and contain oil-based leaks and spills while allowing clean water to filter through. The products can be reused after the oil is removed for recycling.

SGICC also awarded $500 prizes for research at regional universities. Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University won for methane emissions research. The University of Pittsburgh also won for water treatment research and Pennsylvania State University won for similar work.

Only businesses from Pennsylvania and West Virginia were eligible to win the top awards. The SGICC is a member of Ben Franklin Technology Partners, a state-backed, technology-based economic development program that was established in 1983. More details about the winning technologies and research are available on the center's website.

Four young companies took home a combined $80,000 this month at the fifth annual Shale Gas Innovation Contest for technology breakthroughs that could be applied to the midstream, compressed natural gas (CNG), water treatment and environmental management sectors.

The State College, PA-based Ben Franklin Shale Gas Innovation and Commercialization Center (SGICC) issued checks for $20,000 each to the winning companies from Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Established in 2011 to foster and commercialize early-stage technologies that benefit the environment and the shale gas industry, the SGICC's contest is considered a cornerstone of its work and has grown significantly since its first year.

Aridea Solutions, of Charleston, WV, won for an "on-demand" pneumatic valve system operated through proprietary software via the internet that allows remote control of hard-to-access midstream sites.

Compass Natural Gas, of Mechanicsburg, PA, won an award for the compression stations it has developed that enable significant deliveries of CNG to large and small industrial customers in the region that don't currently have access to a pipeline.

Pittsburgh-based Epiphany Water Solutions took home an award for its well pad-based water remediation technology that uses a proprietary crystallizing chamber to rid wastewater of contaminants, leaving only pure steam that can be further evaporated for zero discharge. The equipment is hybrid powered and can use natural gas, solar or hard-wire power.

HalenHardy LLC, of Bellwood, PA, was the other award winner for its Spilltration product line, which is made from recycled materials and engineered to absorb and contain oil-based leaks and spills while allowing clean water to filter through. The products can be reused after the oil is removed for recycling.

SGICC also awarded $500 prizes for research at regional universities. Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University won for methane emissions research. The University of Pittsburgh also won for water treatment research and Pennsylvania State University won for similar work.

Only businesses from Pennsylvania and West Virginia were eligible to win the top awards. The SGICC is a member of Ben Franklin Technology Partners, a state-backed, technology-based economic development program that was established in 1983. More details about the winning technologies and research are available on the center's website.

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